Sunday, 14 November 2010

Can You Hear Us, Wen Jiabao?

While people in Hong Kong can pretty much freely protest -- like they did today about the jailing of tainted milk activist Zhao Lianhai -- they can't easily cross over to Macau to do the same.

Perhaps it's because Premier Wen Jiabao was in the former Portuguese enclave yesterday...

Some 13 people, five from the Hong Kong Alliance In Support of Patriotic Democratic Movements in China, and seven from the April Fifth Action were denied entry into Macau after making the ferry trip over.

They were trying to hand petitions to the premier calling for the release of Zhao and Nobel Peace Prize winner Liu Xiaobo.

After all, they are only trying to follow the proper process of trying to get redress in China -- handing the authorities a petition.

But Macau officials probably didn't want any trouble with the second-biggest cheese in town, or it was another way to prevent Wen from receiving any kind of petition.

"Seek justice for Liu Xiabo! Can you hear, Wen Jiabao?" members of the April Fifth Action group shouted at the immigration counter where they were stopped.

They were surrounded by 10 officers and then escorted to an interview room where they were told they were refused entry under Macau's internal security law.

"We find the reason given by the Macau government very ridiculous. It said our entry would threaten its internal stability and security," said alliance vice-chairman Lee Cheuk-yan, who was refused entry.

"Asking Premier Wen to carry out democratic reforms and to release Liu Xiaobo -- these are the kinds of views we frequently express in Hong Kong. It is absurd to say such actions would threaten the security of Macau," he said.

It's great to see Hong Kong people trying to see how far they can push the boundaries, and technically, these people should be allowed into Macau.

However, the city is too scared to have anything go wrong, let alone any peep of discontent.

Perhaps this is why senior Chinese officials rarely come to Hong Kong?

2 comments:

  1. there is still a bunch of hard core communists in the central politburo having a tight grip in the decision making process.

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