Wednesday, 4 January 2012

Declaring Cultural War

Chinese President Hu Jintao is warning the West is trying to dominate China through culture and ideology so China must counteract by increasing its cultural production.

He said this in an essay published in Seeking Truth, a Communist Party policy magazine published recently.

The essay was based on a speech he made in October, saying that the West and China were engaged in an escalating culture war.

"We must clearly see that international hostile forces are intensifying the strategic plot of westernizing and dividing China, and ideological and cultural fields are the focal areas of their long-term infiltration," Hu said, according to a translation by Reuters.

"We should deeply understand the seriousness and complexity of the ideological struggle, always sound the alarms and remain vigilant and take forceful measures to be on guard and respond," he added.

These measures, Hu said, should be centered on developing cultural products that can draw the interest of the Chinese and meet the "growing spiritual and cultural demands of the people."

If Hu didn't say the word "cultural", one would think China was threatened with war.

However, Hu doesn't seem to realize or he does with patriotic horror, that young people are happily embracing cultural products from the west, from basketball to Hollywood movies and of course Apple gadgets.

Boys and young men are eager to play basketball recreationally and people are still lapping up Friends reruns and their insatiable demand for Apple products has led to people going to Hong Kong to buy them (for cheaper).

The Chinese government tries to limit the number of Hollywood movies shown in the country every year to about 20, but people still find ways to get a hold of the latest flicks.

China is trying to hit back with blockbusters of its own, like Confucius starring Chow Yun-fatt as the sage, Zhang Yimou's Hero, John Woo's Red Cliff and now The Flowers of War starring Christian Bale as an American man who saves 13 prostitutes in Nanjing.

And it's the ones heavily laced with propaganda like The Founding of a Republic to coincide with the 60th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China are bores, despite the amount of money poured into these productions and the stars falling over themselves to be in the pictures for political brownie points.

Then there are the television shows, some of which are too close to real life or present alternative morality beliefs; the Chinese government gets scared and pulls them off the air

So how can China fight the West when it doesn't have any decent programming?

There are only so many movies you can do about Confucius and the Sino-Japanese war minus the need to spread propaganda consciously...


3 comments:

  1. "...The Flowers of War starring Christian Bale as an American man who saves 13 prostitutes in Nanjing."

    How can you win a cultural war vs the US by having an American man be the hero in a blockbuster film? Can you imagine a Hollywood movie in which Americans are saved by Chinese individuals (other than "2012" -- sort of)?

    "And it's the ones heavily laced with propaganda like The Founding of a Republic to coincide with the 60th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China are bore..."

    Have you seen "The Founding of the Republic"? Personally, I found sections of it (e.g., Mao Zedong's drunken scene as well as the scene involving Tony Leung Kar Fai) to be a major hoot! :D

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  2. Yes you can as it is a small token. Compared to the 353 studios the Communist Chinese just bought in the US. However, will not allow any US citizen, state or company to buy in the Communist Lands. Let alone to play US culture in their country.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Yes you can as it is a small token. Compared to the 353 studios the Communist Chinese just bought in the US. However, will not allow any US citizen, state or company to buy in the Communist Lands. Let alone to play US culture in their country.

    ReplyDelete